Maniac Ball Angels Top 30 Midseason Prospect List – #1-15

The Angels came into this year with one of the worst farm systems in all of baseball, if not the worst.  It lacked impact talent and depth at any position, especially pitching. As you will see with this list, in just half a season, the Angels farm has improved dramatically.  No longer are the top prospects guys who will simply fill a role, but they now truly are impact players.  Four of our top six prospects are left-handed starting pitchers, probably the rarest type of productive player in the game.   We put OFP’s (Overall Future Potential on a 20-80 scale) of 60 or above on six players.  This means that they have the potential to have all-star seasons once they reach their peak in the big leagues.  As a whole, this system has been renewed due to good drafts and an uptick in international signings.  There is still plenty of work to be done, but the future is looking much brighter than it did a year or two ago.

*Stats may be a couple days old.

 

 

1. Sean Newcomb

 

Position: SP (Orem Owlz?)

Age: 21.031

Height/Weight: 6’5″ 240 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/L

OFP : 65

Stock: Rising

Report: Maniac Ball’s #1 prospect is Sean Newcomb, the Angels first-round pick in this years draft. We’re gonna preface this by saying that, although the deadline to sign picks is just 4 days away (July 18th), we don’t see a scenario where Newcomb won’t sign. We’ve talked with people on both sides of the negotiating table and we see no reason to worry. Now let’s delve into why we have Newcomb as the Angels’ top prospect.

Let’s start with his repertoire. Newcomb consistently sits in the 92-94 range with his four-seam fastball. He delivers it with such ease that it gets on hitters extremely quickly. It’s truly incredible to see a mid 90s fastball from someone who looks like he’s soft-tossing. There’s some debate as to which pitch is his best secondary offering, as both his curveball and changeup show the potential to be 60-grade pitches. The changeup has good movement away from right-handers, sitting in the mid 80s. The curveball may take some more time to develop but it is a huge pitch with sweeping action that will probably be more effective against left-handers.  He also throws a fringy slider that we see being eliminated from his aresenal as soon as he hits pro ball.

Newcomb’s stature, 6’5″/240, is exactly what you want to see in a guy that you need to throw 200+ innings. Sure the body is maxed out but Newcomb looks like he can be a workhorse.  He works with easy arm action and should have no trouble remaining a starter.

Finally, guys from the northeast have some mystery to them. They don’t get many reps, as the weather usually dictates when they can play and when they have to sit out. Incidentally, these prospects are usually more raw but scouts truly don’t know what they are capable of. With Newcomb, there’s a chance he becomes a bonafide #2 starter in the big leagues as early as 2017.  He should see some time in the big leagues in 2016, setting him up for a 2017 full-time debut.

Video:

2. Ricardo Sanchez

 

Position: SP (AZL Angels)

Age: 17.084

Height/Weight: 6’0″ 170 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/L

OFP : 65

Stock: Rising

Report: You probably don’t know the name Ricardo Sanchez and that is fine.  But you should begin to familiarize yourself with him sooner rather than later.  It was one year ago this week that Sanchez was signed as a 16-year-old out of Venezuela for 580K. So how has he gone from an undersized Venezuelan teen to the Angels second best prospect in one year’s time?  For one, his fastball now sits in the low 90s, occasionally hitting 95, with very good cutting action.  Reminder: He’s 17.  He has a good feel for a tight curveball and the change up looks like a future plus to plus-plus offering.  He’s 17.

He’s pitched 8.2 innings so far for the AZL Angels, striking out 12, giving up 3 runs, walking just 3.  So far, so good.  This is the part where I’m supposed to tell you about a glaring weakness in Sanchez’s game, but I just really can’t put my finger on it.  His mechanics can get out of whack sometimes and the arm action isn’t exactly ideal, but it works.  He’s not 6’7″ like Jered Weaver, is that a weakness?  In all seriousness, Sanchez has plenty of risk, being as he is just 17 and hasn’t even begun facing tough competition.  But this is probably the one player (save Hunter Green) that you can truly dream upon in the Angels system.

I’m anticipating some blowback for putting Sanchez all the way at #2 and slapping a 65 OFP on him, but sometimes you have to follow your instincts.  Sanchez carries himself very well, has plenty of #rig, and looks like part of a front-of-the-line starter.  It might not happen for half a decade, but Sanchez could be a huge impact pitcher in the Angels rotation.

Video:

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3. Taylor Lindsey

 

Position: 2B  (Salt Lake Bees)

Age: 22.223

Height/Weight: 6’0″ 195 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/R

OFP : 60

Stock: Steady

Report: Last year at AA Arkansas, Lindsey sacrificed some contact for power, which resulted in him hitting 17 homers on the year though it came with a 16.1 strikeout percentage. He also improved his walk rate from 2012, going from 4.9% to 8.5%, and now that Lindsey is with AAA Salt Lake, his walk rate is now 9.6%. Lindsey’s strikeout percentage has also come down to 12.8%. What you might notice with Lindsey is that he is hitting only .239 and Salt Lake and the PCL is well-known for being a hitters league. You might also notice that Lindey’s BABIP is a mere .254, which means he’s due for some positive regression. Although with Lindsey’s approach and how even minor league teams are shifting now, it could explain why his BABIP is so low. Lindsey is a pull happy hitter, all of his homeruns last year were either to right-center field or right field, he even hit 7 homeruns at home at Dickey-Stephens park which is notorious for being an extremely hard place to hit, though it is only 330 feet to the right field wall.

Anyway, let’s get into the tools, we’ll start with his fielding and baserunning. You’re looking at an average defensive second baseman with Lindsey, nothing too flashy but he should be able to make the routine plays a bit more. The baserunning is also average, though with speed, you will only get worse with age, fortunately Lindsey is pretty young and is close to 5 years younger than the AAA average age. Like I said, Lindsey is a pull happy hitter, so he’s susceptible to the shift but if you factor in the plate discipline, you’re looking at a above average hit tool. As for the power, you probably won’t be seeing more than 15 home runs a season and I’d put the range somewhere in between 5-10 HR with Lindsey’s peak being around 12-15.

Video:

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4. Jose Rondon

 

Position: SS (Inland Empire 66ers)

Age: 20.119

Height/Weight: 6’1″ 170 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 55

Stock: Rising

Report: Rondon has had a strange year in the fact that in the areas where we thought he was plus he has struggled in, and the areas where he previously struggled, he has excelled in.  Let’s start with the positives.  He’s 7th in the league in hitting (.325), his glove has played up a little bit more, and he’s grown into his body well.  And he’s doing all of this while still 2.7 years younger than the league average.  On the flip side, Rondon’s plate discipline seems to have disappeared.  His BB% has been nearly halved from 2013 (9.5% to 4.9%) and he has struck out 6% more as well (9.8% to 15.8%).  The power, which we thought was going to develop this year hasn’t at all, as his swing lends itself to more line drives than raw power.  Furthermore, we have heard about some makeup issues with Rondon off the field, but that remains to be seen if it will be a big problem moving forward.

Not all is lost, though.  Rondon is a very polished player with plus plus instincts.  He simply lacks the “wow” tools that scouts like to see in young players.  The bat is good, the glove works, the speed is solid-average, and the arm is good enough for shortstop.  Realistically, Rondon becomes a very good utility man with a few seasons as a starting shortstop.  There is a decent chance that the bat continues to develop, making him a first-division starter, hence the 55 OFP.  Rondon’s 2014 campaign has definitely given us a better look at the player he looks to become.  No longer is he a question mark with superstar potential, but he now has shown himself to be a solid player with a high floor, and a ceiling of a starting shortstop.  He likely won’t be an all-star but he will be a big leaguer within a few years. With Eric Stamets in Double-A and Jose Rondon just behind him, the Angels look like they will have a couple options to mix and match after Erick Aybar‘s current contract expires in 2016.

Video:

 

 

5. Nate Smith

 

Position: SP (Arkansas Travelers)

Age: 22.310

Height/Weight: 6’3″ 200 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/L

OFP : 55

Stock: Rising

Report:  Nate Smith isn’t a guy that will wow you, much like Rondon, but he gets the job done and he is destined for a big league rotation in the near future. Let’s take a look at Smith’s arsenal.  He throws a fastball in the high 80s, but locates it well and can cut it in on right-handers.  Overall, it’s a below-average pitch.  His curveball shows promise with hard, biting action, getting swings-and-misses on the upper 70s pitch.  Finally, his change up is his bread-and-butter offering.  I’m comfortable saying that Smith currently has the best change up in the Angels minor league system.  He throws it with the same arm angle as his fastball, but the differential in speed is 13-15 MPH.  Not only that, but it has such a hard bite that it has the potential to make big league hitters look foolish.

I’ve seen Nate Smith pitch twice in person this year and have come away impressed both times.  His mechanics are very smooth; he gets solid extension yet is poised through his drive.  Doesn’t rattle easily and knows how to pitch.  Moving forward, Smith could work on refining his fastball command, as his BB/9 rate has nearly doubled to 4.4 since jumping up to Double-A.

So put this all together and you have a quality back-of-the-rotation starter for years to come. Nothing too sexy, but an extremely valuable piece nonetheless.

Video:

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6. Hunter Green

 

Position: SP (Orem Owlz)

Age: 19.000

Height/Weight: 6’4″ 175 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/L

OFP : 60

Stock: Falling

Report: To be clear, the only reason that we have Green falling to number six is due to the nagging back injury that has kept him out of play in 2014 thus far.  We simply haven’t been able to see how much progress he has made.  Green was the Angels first pick (2nd round) in the 2013 draft.  The one word you will see when reading about Green is ‘projectable’.  He throws three pitches that all have the potential to be plus offerings but they all need to see game action so he can fine-tune them.  His fastball sits in the upper 80s/low 90s at present but as he adds weight and tweaks his delivery, there’s no reason to believe he won’t be touching the mid 90s when all is said and done.  His curveball has the potential to be a solid-average pitch and his change up should at least make for a reliable secondary pitch.

Green throws from a high 3/4’s arm slot, making it more difficult for left-handers to pick up on the pitch.  He’s a good athlete and he fields his position very well.  There’s some concern when it comes to his command, but it doesn’t seem like anything major and we’ll chalk it up to his age and inexperience.

Green clearly has a long way to go and the risk is high but the reward is that of  #2 or #3 starter.  If the Angels are patient with him, Hunter Green will easily become one of the top young arms in the system.

Video:

No charts available because Green has yet to pitch this season.

 

7. Alex Yarbrough

 

Position: 2B

Age: 22.343

Height/Weight: 6’0″ 195 lb.

Bats/Throws: S/R

OFP : 50

Stock: Rising

Report: Alex Yarbrough possesses the one tool that can carry a major leaguer for a very long time: a good hit tool. After hitting .313/.341/.459 in High A Inland Empire last year, he has followed it up by posting a .292/.320/.428 line so far this year. While the overall line is down, he’s actually having a better year considering he’s playing in a much tougher league. His wRC+ is actually higher at 113 in 2014 than it was at 108 last season.

Alex Yarbrough has a silky smooth swing from both sides of the plate. Yarbrough has a plate approach that is similar to current Angels 2nd basemen, which can be taken as a positive and a negative.  Yarbrough doesn’t show much plate discipline(sub 5% BB rates the past 2 seasons) and he strikes out more than you would like(22.9% K rate this season). However, he displays a good ability to hit pitches anywhere in the strike zone and has very good gap to gap power. The home runs may come later on but right now, he currently has 35+ doubles potential in the major leagues. Yarbrough shows plus bat speed but he doesn’t get a lot of lift on baseballs, which explains the high double-low home run results.

Defensively speaking, Yarbough is right in the average-above average range. He makes the plays he needs to make and his plus speed helps him make some plays that many 2nd basemen can’t make. He does have iffy footwork which holds him back from getting to the very difficult balls. His plus speed will probably allow him to steal 10-15 bases at the big league level.

I believe that Yarbrough has the ceiling of being an average second baseman at the big league level, which is nothing to sneeze at. His hit tool, athleticism, and good glove should carry him to be a very useful major leaguer for many years. His approach at the plate will need some heavy refining however or he’ll be eaten alive by advanced arms at the big league level. Either way, you can expect Yarbrough to be knocking on the door late in 2015 or possibly in 2016.

 

Video:

http://m.mlb.com/video/?content_id=23887871&topic_id=6479266

 

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8. Kyle McGowin

 

Position: SP (Inland Empire/Arkansas)

Age: 22.216

Height/Weight: 6’3″ 180 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 55

Stock: Rising

Report: We rated McGowin as our 20th best prospect on our preseason list but also thought he had huge breakout potential. From our list: “McGowin, a 5th round pick in the 2013 draft, has the potential to be a top 10 prospect in the Angels system as soon as next year.” McGowin is on the shelf right now with a minor arm injury but when he’s pitched, he’s been great. Across 2 levels at High A Inland Empire and AA Arkansas, McGowin has a 3.13 ERA with a 7.2 K/9 and 2.3 BB/9, good for a 3.19 K/BB ratio. He’s posted a solid 0.7 HR/9 rate and 8.1 H/9 rate. Maybe more telling is his 2.35 groundball/flyball rate, a very good rate. In his 1st full season in the minor leagues, McGowin has climbed the ranks of the Angels prospect rankings all the way into the top 10.

McGowin features a 4 pitch mix which includes 2 fastballs, a change up and a slider, arguably his best pitch. His four seam fastball sits around 90-92 with some arm side action but can bump it up to 93-94 when needed. He utilizes a two seam fastball that sits in the high 80’s but features more sink to it, mainly used to generate the many ground balls he gets. His change up is a work in progress still but some reports say it has developed a bit this season. His best out pitch is his big slider that sits in the low 80’s range. This pitch has much more vertical drop than a prototypical slider has and could be considered a “slurve” by some.

At 6’3 180 lbs, McGowin is able to generate good downhill plane, which would explain his low home run rate and high ground ball rate. McGowin has a very quick and easy delivery. Nothing really stands out as a huge red flag in his mechanics. One thing you see in the video is he falls off the mound a bit towards the 1st base side, which can lead to inconsistent release points. However, we don’t have newer video on him so this may have been fixed. He comes at hitters with a 3/4 arm slot. Overall, he has clean mechanics and with the stuff he possesses and the command he’s shown, we think McGowin has #3/4 starter potential.

Video:

Kyle  McGowin 1

Kyle  McGowin Chart 2

9. Joe Gatto

 

Position: SP AZL Angels

Age: 19.029

Height/Weight: 6’3″ 204 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 55

Stock: Steady

Report: When we did our draft preview, we made a list of names to determine which players would make the cut for the review. I liked Gatto coming into the draft but not enough to get into our review, I viewed him as a late 1st round pick and possibly even going into the supplemental rounds. He eventually was drafted in the second round and the Angels went over slot to sign him. The big thing with Gatto is repeating his delivery and finding that release point, his stuff is what you’d typically get out of a high school arm, crisp fastball, solid but inconsistent breaker, and a poor change. You have to attribute the inconsistency to the breaker and the release point, to not only being a high school arm but also being from the North-East by not playing year round. His development will take longer than our previous second rounder, Hunter Green, but it should be worth the wait. Right now, you can look at Gatto and see a backend starter but in the future he could be as good as a #3.

Video:

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10.  Natanael Delgado

 

Position: OF (Orem Owlz)

Age: 18.254

Height/Weight: 6’1″ 170 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/L

OFP : 60

Stock: Rising

Report:  If you like prospects that could become a middle-of-the-order big league bat or could flame out in Double-A, Natanael Delgado is the prospect for you.  The Angels signed Delgado out of the Dominican Republic in 2012 for 280k.  Delgado possesses some of the best raw power in the organization, with a loose and easy swing.  The bat speed he creates is extremely rare for someone of his age, especially from the left-side.  He’s beginning to gain weight on his once skinny frame, as he’s probably more like 185 or 190 pounds.  This bodes well for the progress of the power tool, even if it means sacrificing a step from his average speed.

Delgado needs to vastly improve two major areas of his game to become a bonafide top prospect.  One, his aggressiveness at the plate needs to be tamed back.  He’s walked just 12 times while striking out 51 times in just 250 career plate appearances.  The raw power won’t mean much if he swings at pitcher’s pitches.  Second, and this will likely just come with more reps, but Delgado must improve on defense.  Last season in instructs, Delgado was simply terrible in the outfield.  This year, he’s made many of his starts at DH as he works on his defense behind-the-scenes.  His poor defense could just be a case of getting used to left-field and his new surroundings combined with his inexperience.  And we’ll chalk it up to that until he gives us reason to think otherwise.

The raw tools are there for Delgado to become a legit power hitter, something the Angels haven’t seen come from their system since Mark Trumbo.  The question is can he develop the feel for hitting necessary to climb the ladder to the big leagues?

Video:

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11. R.J. Alvarez

 

Position: RP (Arkansas Travelers)

Age: 23.030

Height/Weight: 6’1″  180 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP: 60

Stock: Rising

Report: One of the reasons the Angels chose Alvarez with their first pick (third round) in 2012 was that he could rise through the Angels organization quickly, and he’s been doing exactly that. He’s been a dominant force out of the bullpen his entire time in the organization. He dominated Low-A in 2012 with 12.5 K/9 and 3.29 ERA in 27.1 innings. He stepped it up in High-A in 2013 with a 14.6 K/9 and 2.96 ERA in 48.2 innings, though his walk rate went up (from 3.6 BB/9 in 2012 to 5.0 BB/9 in 2013). So far this year in Double-A Arkansas, he’s been even more superb. Through his first 19 innings (before being out for over a month with elbow tenderness), he did not give up a single run. Unfortunately, in his first outing back on June 25th, he allowed an unearned run, and even more recently he gave up his first earned run. In any case, his ERA is barely above zero, his K/9 rate is right around 13, and his WHIP is a chunk under one.

His repertoire is a fastball that sits around 95 (tops out at 97), late-breaking slider that’s usually around 83-85MPH, and a low-80s changeup. He originally had a curveball in college, but that has since been replaced with a slider. His arm slot is between three-quarters and sidearm, but his quick erratic motion, along with his stuff, can have a bit of a flinch-factor for opposing batters. His control can be categorized at times as “effective wildness.” While he has struggled a bit in the past with off-speed control, he’s done a fine job this year with his control in general, which can be seen by him sporting his lowest walk rate of his professional career so far. Some of his control problems can be attribute to his erratic pitching motion, which has been known to have him falling off of the mound.

Alvarez was likely going to be called up during the period he was dealing with elbow tenderness this year, which shown to be rather untimely. He is still likely to get the call up sometime this year, which could likely be before September call-ups. For the future, he’ll definitely find himself in the back-end of the Angels’ bullpen, and a good chance of being the Angels’ future closer.

Video:

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R.J.  Alvarez Batter Results Breakdown- 7/11/14

 

12. Elliot Morris

 

Position: SP (Burlington/Inland Empire)

Age: 22.0666

Height/Weight: 6’4″ 210 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 50

Stock: Rising

Elliot Morris has shown some extremely good strikeout ability across 2 levels in Low A Burlington and High A Inland Empire so far this year. Morris is a very polished pitcher and projects to be up in the majors sometime in 2016. Morris is currently posting a 8.9 K/9 rate across 2 levels so the stuff has been there for the majority of the year. He has ran into trouble with his command as he is posting a 4.4 BB/9 rate. Morris has struggled some in his jump to High A Inland Empire, seeing all his numbers decline across the board.

Morris has a 3 pitch mix: Fastball, change up and a spike curve. Right now, his fastball is his best pitch. It sits in the 91-93 range with the ability to hit 95 and has some good sink to it at times. What makes the pitch better is his good command of the pitch. His curve ball is inconsistent at times but he shows some good future potential. It’s a hard curve, one that sits in the low 80’s and has some drop that may make the pitch be confused as a slider. His change up isn’t great currently but it has some decent fade action to it and sits in the low to mid 80’s. With a little tinkering, this could become a useful weapon.

Morris is very athletic at 6’4” and is able to get some nice downhill plane, making his fastball even tougher to hit. Nothing is flashy about his mechanics, just a simple drop and drive. He moves at a quick pace and is quick through his mechanics. I was able to see him start a few weeks back and he had a pretty solid showing. He allowed 2 home runs, which were responsible for the few runs he allowed. His fastball gets very flat when he elevates it but when he’s working down in the zone with it, it’s a very tough pitch to barrel up. His curve ball showed some hard break but it isn’t an incredibly depth-y pitch, which means he needs to keep it in the lower 3rd of the zone. His change up really needs some work as it lacks any real movement and has a tendency to get elevated. We think that Morris has #4 starter potential but could slide into the bullpen if starting doesn’t work out.

Video:

Elliot  Morris Chart 1

Elliot  Morris Chart 2

13. Jairo Diaz

 

Position: RP

Age: 23.041

Height/Weight: 6’0″ 195 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 50

Stock: Rising

Jairo Diaz is one of the quickest risers in the Angels system and almost literally came out of nowhere. He was not ranked in the rankings for any Angels top prospect list coming into the season but he is now making his statement as a legit prospect. While his 4.32 ERA isn’t special, he’s striking out more than a batter per inning with a 11 K/9 rate. He’s also not walking many batters as advertised by his 2.8 BB/9 and his H/9 rate is at 8 so he’s limiting baserunners. He’s keeping the ball in the yard, posting a 0.6 HR/9. All his peripherals don’t match up with the ERA so it’s best to look past his ERA right now and look at what he’s actually done to hitters.

Diaz features electric stuff, plain and simple. His fastball is his best weapon as it sits 96-98 but can reach triple digits with ease. He gets some natural arm side run to it, which makes it a death pitch on right handed hitters. His slider is also a weapon that he can also throw for strikes. There isn’t a ton of break to it but he throws is super hard and it has very good bite to it. His slider will generally sit in the 87-91 mph range. His change up isn’t utilized as much but it’s another potential plus pitch since he doesn’t change his arm speed. This pitch will sit in the high 80’s range, which gives it a nice change of speed from the fastball.

Diaz has your prototypical mechanics from a hard throwing right handed reliever. He goes from a ¾ arm slot and generates a ton of torque from a decent twist he has before he begins to throw the ball. Diaz has shown solid command and with the stuff he possesses, he could be a legit set up man in the majors. Maybe we’re jumping the gun based on a few months of data but based on what I saw in an outing he pitched in, the hype is warranted. He has electric stuff.

Video:

Jairo  Diaz Chart 1

Jairo  Diaz Chart 2

14. Keynan Middleton

 

Position: SP (Orem Owlz)

Age: 20.304

Height/Weight: 6’2″ 185 lb.

Bats/Throws: R/R

OFP : 50

Stock: Steady

Report: Keynan Middleton is a project that the Angels took a chance on in last years draft.  He’s only been pitching for approximately 3-4 years now, and it seems like he may be getting the hang of things.  Middleton’s fastball, like many of the Angels arms, sits in the low 90s.  Not a special pitch, and it doesn’t have much movement, but it works.  His offspeed pitches show some raw promise, as he possesses a nice sharp slider and a changeup that he has started to harness.  He still struggles getting his secondary pitches over the plate, which is something he’ll need to work on as he gets older.  Middleton has struggled this year statistically, posting a 5.52 ERA in the hitter friendly Pioneer League.  However, his stuff looks good.  He simply needs reps and to get used to pitching every five days.

It’s hard to project Middleton moving forward as he is such a question mark.  There’s no doubt that it’s gonna take some time for him to develop, and it might not even happen at all.  But because he has such a live arm, Middleton has a good chance to at least become a back-of-the-rotation starter.

Video:

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15. Chris Ellis

 

Position: SP

Age: 21.289

Height/Weight: 6’5″ 205 lb.

Bats/Throws: L/R

OFP : 50

Stock: Steady

Chris Ellis was the Angels 3rd round selection in the draft last month and there is a good chance he is a top 10 prospect in the system by the time next year rolls around.

At 6’5” 205 pounds, Ellis has a very tall and lanky frame, a very good advantage for a guy with a good fastball. His fastball will sit in the low 90’s but will crank it up into the 94-96 range when needed When Ellis is getting on top of the ball, he is able to generate good sink to his already good fastball. His main issue with the pitch has been commanding it, something that can be fixed over time. Ellis has a curveball that is solid but unspectacular. It will sit in the high 70’s/low 80’s range, a hard curve ball you may call it. The curve gets some good 11-5 break but he is unable to throw is consistently and for strikes at the moment. Ellis’ best pitch is his change up according to many people. There is good separation from his fastball as this pitch will sit in the low 80’s range. With natural fade action on it, Ellis is able to throw his changeup with good arm action and creates good deceptiveness.

Ellis hasn’t been a starter for very long so the inconsistencies with the mechanics are to be expected. Ellis runs into command issues because he stabs his arm back as he goes into his throwing motion, leading to his release points to be all over. A simple fix of slowing his motion down could lead to some better command.

Video:


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